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Стихи на английском языке для школьников

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The Jumblies

They went to sea in a Sieve, they did,

In a Sieve they went to sea;

In spite of all their friends could say,

On a winter's morn, on a stormy day,

In a Sieve they went to sea!

And when the Sieve turned round and round,

And everyone cried, 'You'll all be drowned!'

They called aloud, 'Our Sieve ain't big,

But we don't care a button! we don't care a fig!

In a Sieve we'll go to sea!'

Far and few, far and few,

Are the lands where the Jumblies live;

Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,

And they went to sea in a Sieve.

They sailed away in a Sieve, they did,

In a Sieve they sailed so fast,

With only a beautiful pea-green veil

Tied with a riband by way of a sail,

To a small tobacco-pipe mast;

And everyone said, who saw them go,

'O won't they be soon upset, you know!

For the sky is dark, and the voyage is long,

And happen what may, it's extremely wrong

In a Sieve to sail so fast!'

Far and few, far and few,

Are the lands where the Jumblies live;

Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,

And they went to sea in a Sieve.

The water it soon came in, it did,

The water it soon came in;

So to keep them dry, they wrapped their feet

In a pinky paper all folded neat,

And they fastened it down with a pin.

And they passed the night in a crockery-jar,

And each of them said, 'How wise we are!

Though the sky be dark, and the voyage be long,

Yet we never can think we were rash or wrong,

While round in our Sieve we spin!'

Far and few, far and few,

Are the lands where the Jumblies live;

Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,

And they went to sea in a Sieve.

And all night long they sailed away;

And when the sun went down,

They whistled and warbled a moony song

To the echoing sound of a coppery gong,

In the shade of the mountains brown.

'O Timballoo! How happy we are,

When we live in a sieve and a crockery-jar,

And all night long in the moonlight pale,

We sail away with a pea-green sail,

In the shade of the mountains brown!'

Far and few, far and few,

Are the lands where the Jumblies live;

Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,

And they went to sea in a Sieve.

They sailed to the Western Sea, they did,

To a land all covered with trees,

And they bought an Owl, and a useful Cart,

And a pound of Rice, and a Cranberry Tart,

And a hive of silvery Bees.

And they bought a Pig, and some green Jackdaws,

And a lovely Monkey with lollipop paws,

And forty bottles of Ring-Bo-Ree,

And no end of Stilton Cheese.

Far and few, far and few,

Are the lands where the Jumblies live;

Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,

And they went to sea in a Sieve.

And in twenty years they all came back,

In twenty years or more,

And everyone said, 'How tall they've grown!

For they've been to the Lakes, and the Torrible Zone,

And the hills of the Chankly Bore!'

Far and few, far and few,

Are the lands where the Jumblies live;

Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,

And they went to sea in a Sieve.

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The Courtship Of the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo

On the Coast of Coromandel

Where the early pumpkins blow,

In the middle of the woods

Lived the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

Two old chairs, and half a candle,-

One old jug without a handle,-

These were all his worldly goods:

In the middle of the woods,

These were all the worldly goods,

Of the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo,

Of the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

Once, among the Bong-trees walking

Where the early pumpkins blow,

To a little heap of stones Came the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

There he heard a Lady talking,

To some milk-white Hens of Dorking,-

'Tis the Lady Jingly Jones!

On that little heap of stones

Sits the Lady Jingly Jones!'

Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo,

Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

'Lady Jingly! Lady Jingly!

Sitting where the pumpkins blow,

Will you come and be my wife?'

Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

'I am tired of living singly,-

On this coast so wild and shingly,-

I'm a-weary of my life:

If you'll come and be my wife,

Quite serene would be my life!'

Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo,

Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

'On this Coast of Coromandel,

Shrimps and watercresses grow,

Prawns are plentiful and cheap,'

Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

'You shall have my Chairs and candle,

And my jug without a handle!-

Gaze upon the rolling deep

(Fish is plentiful and cheap)

As the sea, my love is deep!'

Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo,

Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

Lady Jingly answered sadly,

And her tears began to flow,-

'Your proposal comes too late,

Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!

I would be your wife most gladly!'

(Here she twirled her fingers madly,)

'But in England I've a mate!

Yes! you've asked me far too late,

For in England I've a mate,

Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!

Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!'

'Mr Jones-(his name is Handel,-

Handel Jones, Esquire, & Co)

Dorking fowls delights to send,

Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!

Keep, oh! keep your chairs and candle,

And your jug without a handle, -

I can merely be your friend!

-Should my Jones more Dorkings send,

I will give you three, my friend!

Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!

Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!

Though you've such a tiny body,

And your head so large doth grow,-

Though your hat may blow away,

Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!

Though you're such a Hoddy Doddy-

Yet I wish that I could modi-

fy the words I needs must say!

Will you please to go away?

That is all I have to say-

Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!

Mr Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo!'

Down the slippery slopes of Myrtle,

Where the early pumpkins blow,

To the calm and silent sea

Fled the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

There, beyond the Bay of Gurtle,

Lay a large and lively Turtle;-

'You're the Cove,' he said, 'for me

On your back beyond the sea,

Turtle, you shall carry me!'

Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo,

Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

Through the silent-roaring ocean

Did the Turtle swiftly go;

Holding fast upon his shell

Rode the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

With a sad primaeval motion

Towards the sunset isles of Boshen

Still the Turtle bore him well.

Holding fast upon his shell,

'Lady Jingly Jones, farewell!'

Sang the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

Sang the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

From the Coast of Coromandel,

Did that Lady never go;

On that heap of stones she mourns

For the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

On that Coast of Coromandel,

In his jug without a handle

Still she weeps and daily moans;

On that little heap of stones

To her Dorking Hens she moans,

For the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo,

For the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bo.

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The Pobble who has no toes

The Pobble who has no toes

Had once as many as we;

When they said, 'Some day you may lose them all'

He replied, 'Fish fiddle de-dee!

'And his Aunt Jobiska made him drink,

Lavender water tinged with pink,

For she said, 'The World in general knows

There's nothing so good for a Pobble's toes!'

The Pobble who has no toes,

Swam across the Bristol Channel;

But before he set out he wrapped his nose,

In a piece of scarlet flannel.

For his Aunt Jobiska said, 'No harm

Can come to his toes if his nose is warm;

And it's perfectly known that a Pobble's toes

Are safe-provided he minds his nose.'

The Pobble swam fast and well

And when boats or ships came near him

He tinkledy-binkledy-winkled a bell

So that all the world could hear him.

And all the Sailors and Admirals cried,

When they saw him nearing the further side-

'He has gone to fish, for his Aunt Jobiska's

Runcible Cat with crimson whiskers!'

But before he touched the shore,

The shore of the Bristol Channel,

A sea-green Porpoise carried away

His wrapper of scarlet flannel.

And when he came to observe his feet

Formerly garnished with toes so neat

His face at once became forlorn

On perceiving that all his toes were gone!

And nobody ever knew

From that dark day to the present,

Whoso had taken the Pobble's toes,

In a manner so far from pleasant.

Whether the shrimps or crawfish grey,

Or crafty Mermaids stole them away-

Nobody; and nobody knows

How the Pobble was robbed of his twice five toes!

The Pobble who has no toes

Was placed in a friendly Bark,

And they rowed him back, and carried him up,

To his Aunt Jobiska's Park.

And she made him a feast at his earnest wish

Of eggs and buttercups fried with fish -

And she said, 'It's a fact the whole world knows,

That Pobbles are happier without their toes!

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The Quangle Wangle's hat

On top of the Crumpetty Tree

The Quangle Wangle sat,

But his face you could not see,

On account of his Beaver Hat.

For his Hat was a hundred and two feet wide,

With ribbons and bibbons on every side,

And bells, and buttons, and loops, and lace,

So that nobody ever could see the face

Of the Quangle Wangle Quee.

The Quangle Wangle said

To himself on the Crumpetty Tree,

'Jam, and jelly, and bread

Are the best of food for me!

But the longer I live on this Crumpetty Tree

The plainer than ever it seems to me

That very few people come this way

And that life on the whole is far from gay!'

Said the Quangle Wangle Quee.

But there came to the Crumpetty Tree

Mr and Mrs Canary;

And they said, 'Did you ever see

Any spot so charmingly airy?

May we build a nest on your lovely Hat?

Mr Quangle Wangle, grant us that!

Oh, please let us come and build a nest,

Of whatever material suits you best,

Mr Quangle Wangle Quee!'

And besides, to the Crumpetty Tree

Came the Stork, the Duck, and the Owl;

The Snail and the Bumble Bee,

The Frog and the Fimble Fowl

(The Fimble Fowl, with a corkscrew leg);

And all of them said, 'We humbly beg

We may build our homes on your lovely Hat-

Mr Quangle Wangle, grant us that!

Mr Quangle Wangle Quee!'

And the Golden Grouse came there,

And the Pobble who has no toes,

And the small Olympian Bear,

And the Dong with a luminous nose.

And the Blue Baboon who played the flute,

And the Orient Calf from the Land of Tute,

And the Attery Squash, and the Bisky Bat-

All came and built on the lovely Hat

Of the Quangle Wangle Quee!

And the Quangle Wangle said

To himself on the Crumpetty Tree,

'When all these creatures move

What a wonderful noise there'll be!'

And at night by the light of the Mulberry Moon

They danced to the Flute of the Blue Baboon,

On the broad green leaves of the Crumpetty Tree,

And all were as happy as happy could be,

With the Quangle Wangle Quee.

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The Owl and the Pussy-cat

The Owl and the Pussy-cat went to sea

In a beautiful pea-green boat,

They took some honey, and plenty of money,

Wrapped up in a five-pound note,

The Owl looked up to the stars above,

And sang to a small guitar,

'O lovely Pussy! O Pussy, my love,

What a beautiful Pussy you are,

You are,

You are!

What a beautiful Pussy you are!'

Pussy said to the Owl, 'You elegant fowl!

How charmingly sweet you sing!

O let us be married! too long we have tarried:

But what shall we do for a ring?'

They sailed away, for a year and a day,

To the land where the Bong-tree grows

And there in a wood a Piggy-wig stood

With a ring at the end of his nose,

His nose,

His nose,

With a ring at the end of his nose.

'Dear Pig, are you willing to sell for one shilling

Your ring?' Said the Piggy, 'I will.'

So they took it away, and were married next day

By the turkey who lives on the hill.

They dined on mince, and slices of quince,

Which they ate with a runcible spoon;

And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand,

They danced by the light of the moon,

The moon,

The moon,

They danced by the light of the moon.

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London Bridge

London Bridge has fallen down,

Fallen down, fallen down,

London Bridge has fallen down,

My fair Lady.

Build it up with wood and clay,

Wood and clay, wood and clay,

Build it up with wood and clay,

My fair Lady.

Wood and clay will wash away,

Wash away, wash away,

Wood and clay will wash away,

My fair Lady.

Build it up with bricks and mortar,

Bricks and mortar, bricks and mortar,

Build it up with bricks and mortar,

My fair Lady.

Bricks and mortar will not stay,

Will not stay, will not stay,

Bricks and mortar will not stay,

My fair Lady.

Build it up with iron and steel,

Iron and steel, iron and steel,

Build it up with iron and steel,

My fair Lady.

Iron and steel will bend and bow,

Bend and bow, bend and bow,

Iron and steel will bend and bow,

My fair Lady.

Build it up with silver and gold,

Silver and gold, silver and gold,

Build it up with silver and gold,

My fair Lady.

Silver and gold will be stolen away,

Stolen away, stolen away,

Silver and gold will be stolen away,

My fair Lady.

Set a man to watch all nigh,

Watch all night, watch all night,

Set a man to watch all night,

My fair Lady.

Suppose the man should fall asleep,

Fall asleep, fall asleep,

Suppose the man should fall asleep?

My fair Lady.

Give him a pipe to smoke all night,

Smoke all night, smoke all night,

Give him a pipe to smoke all night,

My fair Lady.

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I'm a Wizard, I'm a Warlock

I'm a wizard, I'm a warlock,

I'm a wonder of the age.

I'm a sorcerer, magician,

prestidigitator, mage.

I can change into a chicken,

or perhaps a purple pig.

I can wave my wand and, presto,

I'm a waffle with a wig.

With the power in my pinky

I can burst like a balloon

or transform into a tiger

with the head of a baboon.

If I wiggle on my earlobe

or I knock upon my knee

I become a dancing doughnut

or a turtle in a tree.

Just a simple incantation

and I deftly disappear,

which I never should have done

because I've been this way all year.

And despite my mighty magic

I'm impossible to see,

for I never learned the spells I need

to turn back into me.

Kenn Nesbitt

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The Tiger and the Zebra

The tiger phoned the zebra

and invited him to dine.

He said "If you could join me

that would simply be divine."

The zebra said "I thank you,

but respectfully decline.

I heard you ate the antelope;

he was a friend of mine."

On hearing this the tiger cried

"I must admit it's true!

I also ate the buffalo,

the llama and the gnu.

And yes I ate the warthog,

the gazelle and kangaroo,

but I could never eat a creature

beautiful as you.

"You see I have a secret

I'm embarrassed to confide:

I look on you with envy

and a modicum of pride.

Of all the creatures ever known,"

the tiger gently sighed,

"It seems we are the only two

with such a stripy hide.

"Now seeing how we share this

strong resemblance of the skin,

I only can conclude that we are

just as close as kin.

This means you are my brother

and, though fearsome I have been,

I could not eat my brother,

that would surely be a sin."

The zebra thought, and then replied

"I'm certain you are right.

The stripy coats we both possess

are such a handsome sight!

My brother, will you let me

reconsider if I might?

My calendar is empty so

please let us dine tonight."

The tiger met the zebra in

his brand-new fancy car

and drove him to a restaurant

which wasn't very far.

And when they both were seated

at a table near the bar,

the zebra asked "What's on the grill?"

The tiger said "You are."

"But please, you cannot dine on me!"

the outraged zebra cried.

"To cook me up and eat me

is a thing I can't abide.

You asked me for your trust

and I unwarily complied.

You said you could not eat me

now you plan to have me fried?"

"And what about the envy

and the modicum of pride?

And what of us as brothers

since we share a stripy hide?"

"I'm sorry," said the tiger

and he smiled as he replied,

"but I love the taste of zebra

so, in other words, I lied."

Kenn Nesbitt

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